All posts filed under: past picks

There There by Tommy Orange

a bookclique pick by Karen Derby When I first read Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, I was fascinated with Tayo’s struggles as a Native American when he returns home from World War II. In Japan, he faced an enemy that looked strangely like himself. Silko’s novel made […]

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The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai

a bookclique pick by Stacey Loscalzo A few weeks ago, one of my favorite librarians urged me to read The Great Believers. I was sold when she said, “It’s A Little Life — Lite.” While A Little Life was a devastatingly difficult book to read, it […]

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Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

a bookclique pick by Mela Frye On a cool December morning in 1958, Flannery O’Connor gave birth to a secret lovechild. The father was Kurt Vonnegut, who earlier that year while traveling through Georgia had taken a brief (yet passionate) sojourn in Milledgeville, where O’Connor […]

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Circe by Madeline Miller

a bookclique pick by Jessica Flaxman A hero on a long journey home to his kingdom, wife and child is delayed again and again by mythical creatures and arduous traps. Through cleverness and creativity, along with the patronage of the goddess Athena, Odysseus defeats the […]

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Bookclique’s Best – 2nd Quarter Round-Up

bookclique presents the Top 10 reviews from March to June, 2018. Titles are hyperlinked. Fiction – John Green’s Turtles All the Way Down Fiction -Hanya Yanagahara’s A Little Life Fiction – Jennifer Joukhadar’s The Map of Salt and Stars Fiction – Gabriel Tallent’s My Absolute […]

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My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent

a bookclique pick by Lindsey Mead My Absolute Darling is a fever dream of a novel, as difficult to read as it is impossible to put down.  I read it in two days, a couple of long, breathless gulps, and since I finished I haven’t been able to […]

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Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

a bookclique pick by Katrina Smith There’s nothing more likely to make an English major’s heart flip flop than a novel with an important social message twisted delicately into gorgeous language that cannot help but compel. I felt that flip flop reading Arundhati Roy’s The […]

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